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By Rep. Dennis A. Cardoza (D-Calif.)

Favorability ratings don’t lie. In politics, when your approval rating is below 50 percent, you’re on shaky ground. When you’re between 4 and 13 percent — as this Congress consistently is — you’re in revolution territory! Congress is officially broken due to extreme partisanship on both sides. The real question, however, is who is left to step up and fix it?

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By Juan Williams

The Founding Fathers designed Congress to represent the will of the majority of Americans. Yet, even as more Americans identify themselves as independents — not Democrats or Republicans — there is a painfully sharp decline in moderate and independent voices in both houses of Congress.

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While both parties are resorting to partisan trench warfare, they still share a common set of goals that should be driving the debate. In particular, we see three goals that can provide a pragmatic, non-ideological framework for a sensible debate on taxes.

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By Froma Harrop

To many New Englanders, Olympia Snowe had come to resemble Marilyn of “The Munsters” TV family. The senator from Maine seemed a normal Northeast Republican surrounded by party leaders sprouting fangs and cooing at bats — but who regarded her as the odd one.

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By Nathan Sermonis

With this week’s announcement by Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, prospects of a more united Congress grew a shade darker. Snowe’s plan to retire at the end of this year brings the casualty count this Congress for Senators widely seen as moderates to three – Snowe, Sen. Ben Nelson, D-Neb., and Sen. Joe Lieberman, I-Conn. And the situation looks just as, if not more, worrisome in the House.

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